Beyoncé & JAY-Z Changing Teens' Lives

Beyoncé & JAY-Z Changing Teens' Lives

Partnering up with Boys & Girls Clubs of America to change the lives of teens across the country.

Beyoncé and JAY-Z Giving Club Teens $1.1M for College

Beyoncé and JAY-Z are teaming up with Boys & Girls Clubs of America to change teenagers’ lives across the country. The music superstars are awarding 11 $100,000 scholarships (through the BeyGOOD and Shawn Carter foundations) to send 11 exceptional Boys & Girls Club members with financial need to college.
 
Boys & Girls Clubs of America was chosen to select the 11 high school seniors because of the role Clubs play in young people’s lives. Nationwide, Clubs help kids to recognize and pursue their full potential, providing 4.3 million youth a year with opportunities and new experiences they may not otherwise enjoy. Boys & Girls Clubs believe deeply that a child’s background or the circumstances surrounding them must not limit their access to opportunities that can change their lives for the better. 

Video Thumbnail Image

Want to provide opportunities for more kids? Donate to Boys & Girls Clubs of America now and help more young people realize their dreams and lead our world forward.

Or sign-up to hear more inspirational stories.

Video Thumbnail Image

Khairi

Khairi’s family endured homelessness many times. He can recall “sleeping in a car at night, when only the windows separate you from the cold, and the torn leather seats get colder with every passing hour.” Somehow, he persevered. Now 17, Khairi praises the Boys & Girls Club for providing a quiet, safe place to study and the confidence to earn a 3.5 grade point average. His goal is to attend the University of Oregon to study chemical engineering or information technology.

Video Thumbnail Image

Lauren

Growing up in an urban neighborhood filled with gang violence, the Boys & Girls Club gave Lauren a safe haven amid the dangerous setting. Through Junior Staff – a program for Club teens interested in human services careers – Lauren developed her interpersonal skills, work ethic and accountability. An A student, Lauren will be the first in the family to attend college. Her goal is to study international relations at Columbia University and to one day practice law.

Video Thumbnail Image

Issac

Issac grew up poor, his family sometimes reduced to living in their car. Mercifully, his aunt gave him a permanent home when he was 9. This was also about the time he discovered the Boys & Girls Club. Even at that age, Issac had a passion for mentoring and tutoring younger children. He went on to serve as treasurer, vice president, and president of the Keystone Club teen leadership program. The 17-year-old plans to use his scholarship to pursue a four-year degree in art and design.

Video Thumbnail Image

Nicolas

A longtime target of bullying, Nicolas felt he didn’t belong anywhere. It led to a negative self-image and pessimism about the future. At the Boys & Girls Club, he began to develop self-confidence and enthusiasm for his long-term prospects. Today, the high school senior knows that when obstacles appear, he has the strength to transcend them. Now 17, Nicolas plans to study culinary arts and pursue a bachelor’s degree in business management, with the goal to one day open his own restaurant. 

Video Thumbnail Image

Mikayla

In her 17 years, Mikayla has often faced adversity, including the death of her father. Though her mother worked two jobs, making ends meet was a constant struggle. Mikayla found comfort at her Club. A member since age 6, she particularly enjoys creative programming like photography and fine arts. Through a dual enrollment program, the A student will finish high school with her associate’s degree, then transfer to a four-year college to pursue her bachelor’s degree.

Video Thumbnail Image

Alazae

Alazae has long aspired to be the first in her family to go to college. But despite the long hours her mother works, the family continues to struggle economically. With the support of her Club, however, she remained strong, focused on realizing her goal. Alazae plans to use her windfall to study forensic science at a four-year university, become a pathologist, and help eradicate internal diseases that cause premature death and avoidable illnesses.

Video Thumbnail Image

Ghaffar

Ghaffar came to the Club a shy, quiet 15-year old coping with the death of his best friend. Despite his grief, he joined Junior Staff, a program that helps teens explore human services careers...and helped Ghaffar develop his social skills. Soon, friends came easily. Finding he enjoyed community service, he was soon leading service projects. Once an indifferent student, his grades improved markedly. Now, Ghaffar plans to attend college to become a veterinarian.

Video Thumbnail Image

Emily

When Emily sets a goal, she does everything necessary to achieve it. She made the varsity basketball as a high school freshman, for example, and was named it’s captain the next year. Outgoing, energetic, and always smiling, Emily has personality and enthusiasm that draws people to her. Despite growing up amid dysfunction, the Club was always her safety zone that helped her keep it all together. Emily plans to study criminology at Florida International University.

Jonathan

The youngest in his family, Jonathan’s siblings are all in their 30s with families of their own. Growing up essentially surrounded by adults, the Club was always the place he could just be a kid. Extremely bright and high-tech savvy, Jonathan loves to learn. He carries a grade point average of 3.7 and enjoys extracurricular activities like the Adobe Technology Program. He hopes to use his scholarship to study Electrical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Video Thumbnail Image

Keshawn

Education was always Keshawn’s top priority. Now a high school senior, he and his mom often struggled to make ends meet. But she consistently told Keyshawn to work hard in school and see the big  picture. He knew an education was vital to achieving  his ambition of becoming a lawyer. Now, there are no financial barriers to stop this 5.1 GPA, 3rd in his class, International Baccalaureate student from realizing his dreams.